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Female elected officials

Banner Staff Report

November 14, 2012

Since the beginning of this country, politics have been a male-dominated world.


Women weren’t even allowed to vote until 1920 with the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment.


But in the past 92 years, women have made positive inroads into just about every public office except for U.S. president.


The recent election was another gain for women seeking elected positions. …


From the local to the national level, our government bodies should be a reflection of our community and our nation.


After all, women account for 51 percent of the U.S. population. It only stands to reason that women should play a significant role in government decisions and policies that can impact them.


Yes, more steps forward were taken when five new women — four Democrats and one Republican — were elected to Congress.


Twenty of the 100 seats in the U.S. Senate will belong to women — a record number to this point — when they’re sworn into office in January.


But like we said in the beginning, there has never been a woman president. While progress has been made regarding gender in politics, the time to celebrate will be when we no longer have to acknowledge how far women have come.


It will just be commonplace, and a truer sense of democracy will have been achieved.


Distributed by The Associated Press