Last updated: May 14. 2014 2:13AM - 450 Views

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A Libertarian website recently published a piece about the idea of the U.S. unilaterally giving up nuclear arms. In the comment section, someone called the U.S. government the most evil organization in world.


A Journal Record editor read that piece on April 19, 19 years after an American killed 168 of his fellow citizens in the bomb attack on the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building. Timothy McVeigh, one of the men who perpetrated that atrocity, would have approved of the thinking behind the comment.


Politics matter in our state and our nation. Elected executives, legislators and bureaucrats affect our daily lives. And, in some ways, they reflect and enforce our values as a society.


That’s why the way we discuss issues - and the people running our governments - matters. You may think Gov. Mary Fallin cares too much for short-term gains and not enough for poor people. You may think that President Barack Obama’s policies will cost jobs or slide our nation toward long-term decline.


Disagree with the policies, think about the values that drive them, and fight for what you think is right. Argue about how it affects your bank accounts, what will happen to the economy, or even the example it sets for young people.


But remember that when you say that a decision is immoral, or that a leader is evil, or that it might be time to exercise “a Second Amendment remedy” to affect change, those words can have consequences.


When you promote the idea that policies are made from vindictiveness, hidden anti-Americanism or soullessness, you lay a steppingstone on the path to violence, to the funerals of friends and co-workers, brothers and sisters, parents and children.


Vote. Write emails and make calls. Run for office. But argue for a higher purpose with a civil tongue. Lives depend on it.


— The Journal Record

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